Grip Strength and Hockey


In an interesting study of adolescent Canadian hockey players published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, scientists tested the grip strength of 690 male and female athletes between the ages of 10 and 16 years to see if there was a correlation to on-ice performance.

For males and females, grip strength increased with age at about the same rate until age 12 where males began to show greater strength. In terms of performance, grip strength in the non-dominant hand was associated with competition at more elite levels of the sport.

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Rep Duration for Maximizing Muscle Growth


You can really dig down deep into the details when planning a workout, including timing how long each rep should last. But sometimes going with your intuition is a better approach.

Consider the findings of a study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.

Twelve men with weight training experience did a pair of high-intensity workouts. One involved 3 sets at a self-determined pace. The other 3 sets were timed as 2-seconds for the concentric and 2-seconds as the eccentric part of each rep. Self-determined rep speed resulted in greater volume and muscle activation.

Meal Planning and How Much You Eat


For many people, the three squares: breakfast, lunch and dinner are the traditional mealtimes, with maybe a little snacking in between. Can changing the timing of these eating occasions help you lose body fat? A study published in the Journal of Nutritional Sciences suggests slightly altering this morning, noon and night schedule can have surprising results.

For 10 weeks, some subjects ate breakfast 90 minutes later than normal and sat down to dinner 90 minutes sooner than the typical time. Another groups stuck to regular breakfast, lunch and dinner hours. All subjects kept a food diary, and were allowed to eat anything they wanted.

After the 10-week intervention, subjects on the time-compressed eating schedule lost twice as much body fat as subjects who stuck to the usual meal times. They also consumed less food. Asked if they could maintain these dining hours for more than 10 weeks, 57% of subjects said family pressures and social obligations would make that difficult. The remaining 43% said they could continue if meal timing was more flexible.